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Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
and the uk government on following the lead of the scottish government and scottish parliament in its using equal marriage minimum pricing for alcohol and previously on the smoking ban. given the fact that unemployment is now lower in scotland than the rest of the uk, will he follow the lead of the scottish government by introducing a more shovel-ready measures for economic growth? >> i think what the honorable gentleman will find is because of the measures taken in the autumn statement, there's an extra 300 million pounds for the scottish government to spend, so if they want to spend that on shovel-ready measures they can. but i certainly am happy to say that when good policies are introduced in any party, in the united kingdom to i think we all have the opportunity to follow them. >> order. statements, the prime minister. >> here on c-span2 we will leave the british house of commons now as they move onto other legislative business. you've been watching prime minister's questions time era questions time error of life wednesdays at 7 a.m. eastern of parliament is in session. you can see thi
to avoid the fiscal cliff as the government starts taking steps to buy more time before the u.s. hits the debt ceiling. the yen hits a two-year low against the dollar as the new japanese government battles to weaken currency. exports are rising, pushing the nikkei to its strongest gain in 20 years. .shares of toyota are heading higher after the u.s. settled a class action lawsuit. the $1 billion payment is already priced in. okay. welcome to "worldwide exchange." plenty of news to watch out of washington. all of this week, we thought it would be a quiet one. but i won't be inside the beltway if they want to get something done. the u.s. will hit the $16.4 trillion debt ceiling come monday. in a letter to congressional leaders, geithner says treasury will begin taking steps to save the government about $2 billion. geithner says it's harder to predict a time frame because the ongone fiscal cliff talks make it difficult to forecast next year's budget. among the measures treasury will take including suspending state and local government securities and investments in the federal employee pe
>> welcome to the "journal" coming to you from dw in berlin. >> good to have you with us. our top story this hour -- germany investing 10 billion euros to ensure renewable energy is available. >> will the debate be different in america after the new town school massacre. -- newtown school massacre? >> german policymakers say the countries making good progress and plans to phase out nuclear energy and increase its dependence on renewable energy. >> in berlin this morning, they delivered their first assessment of infrastructure changes that will be needed to phase out nuclear power by 2020. >> with federal elections next year, energy is a key policy issue, and the government says 10 billion euros is being invested to keep the country's infrastructure up to date. >> germany's economics minister and environment ministers say they want to work together to complete the country's energy transformation. in the past, they have squabbled about details, but now, they say they are united. >> we are going to reach our goals. environmental protection by phasing of nuclear energy and expanding t
♪ >>> more yen selling. the u.s. dollar is rising further against the japanese currency on the foreign exchange market. the dollar has risen to the 85-yen level for the first time in 20 months. investors are selling yen on the tokyo foreign exchange on speculation policy makers at the bank of japan will agree to an inflation target proposed by the incoming administration. the new prime minister shinzo abe will take up office later in the day. analysts say the b.o.j. will likely further boost its monetary easing measures. the dollar is currently trading at 85.26-31 yen. ai uchida joins us now from the business desk for more on that. so ai, investors have been trading the dollar-yen quite dramatically over the last several weeks. >> that's right, catherine. just a month and a half ago that pair was trading in the mid 79-yen range. almost six whole yen weaker in just six weeks. a dramatic move indeed. so going forward, what can we expect? well, we spoke to disaburo nezo for his outlook. he is a senior executive fellow at fujitsu research institute. >> the yen's future is no
2011, mr. broussard, u.s. oncology. large producers and providers of health care products to major health care institutions. that background, mr. brousard brings a broad perspective on health care issues facing our country. mr. broussard holds his undergraduate degree from texas a&m and an mba from the university of houston. were very much looking forward to your comments today. thanks for being here. [applause] >> thank you. well, thank you. i really appreciate the opportunity from each one of you. our nation is actually wrestling -- [inaudible] a large amount of debt the united states is facing. i will outline the challenge we face. i'll also show you some transforming health care is one of the ways we can solve that issue. i'll demonstrate how new approaches to integrating the delivery system and how it is already achieving some result outside of the federal government. the health care can harness simplicity, has sustainability, even if the health care system undergoes some significant transformations. first, but to take a moment and talk about ohio and cleveland and how they're
. this is about ten minutes. >> good evening, welcome and thank you for joining us. my name is richard fontaine. i'm the president for the center of new american security. it's a pleasure to welcome you all here to celebrate the publication of robert kaplan's new book the reason geography what they tell us about the coming conflict in the battle against the state. i've heard it said before that you all very great author by reading his books not by buying them -- they will be sold on the stage in this room back here. bald kaplan's work is known no doubt why this audience. he's been a senior fellow and in march of 2008 a foreign correspondent for the atlantic for about a quarter of a century and is currently the chief geopolitical analyst. i first became acquainted with his writing during his book with traces of history of the tight midwesterners living and working in the middle east. and since that book, the very titles of his work goes to the coming anarchy have provoked the debate. the recent book of american power has become acquired reading by those interested in the strategic competition in th
's forum is special for those who work at the presidential library and use the and it is a testimony to the hard work and dedication for those employs to work hard to preserve the nation's history and of president kennedy. this secret recordings of jfk which is now on sale sale, would not have been impossible if not for the incredible skills, talent, professional ism, dedication of our library staff in the. government employees. one person in particular rely to a knowledge its which is then archivist of these white house recording as the archivist who knows more about these taped conversations and any of the american. please join us to acknowledge all of our colleagues work here at the kennedy library. [applause] and we have a wonderful panel with us tonight. joining us is presidential historian, ted widmer has selected the most compelling and important recordings then wrote annotations to put them into context. also ellen fitzpatrick professor of history at the university of new hampshire. also frequent contributor to our forum. tom putnam the outstanding director to bring energy to
eastern europe? anything? >> one of the things that happened since 1989 is the region we used to call eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries no longer have anything in common with one another, except a common memory of communist occupation. poland is as different as greece is from some land. europe is now divided in many ways to -. there are a few elements of the communist past you can see. there is a paranoid element in politics that comes from the legacy of people being spied on and having lived in an oppressive system. they are more paranoid about secret deals behind their backs, because secret deals were done behind their backs, and that is understandable. there is an anxiety about being left behind in the west. the memory of the past continues to play out, but in truth, these countries are more different from one another than they are similar. >> you through -- you chose three of eight countries behind the iron curtain? >> it depends on how you count. >> what were the three democrats i chose to poland, hungary, and east germany. they have different histori
. there was an iron curtain theaters used to use to prevent fires. churchill used it first in private. >> you know why? >> it was a favor for truman. that is where truman was from. >> let's get a slice of that speech. >> an iron curtain has descended across the continent. behind that line, like all the capitals of the ancient states of central and eastern europe -- berlin, prague, vienna, budapest, belgrade, bucharest. all of these famous cities and the population around them lying lie under the soviet sphere. >> why did you want to talk about this? >> i was inspired in my first book, and while this is in no way a sequel it represents thoughts i had. one thing i got interested in is the question why no people went along with it. what is the mentality? what are institutional pressures? why do camp guard do what they are told to do? i decided to write about this period right after world war ii, because it was a time the soviet union had reached a height, there was an apotheosis of stalinism. it was reinforced by the experience of the war. by 1945, it was a fully developed system with an economic theory
building institutions upon this foundation. if it is rejected, i will use my authority and duty to create a new constitutional assembly based on an agreement or on direct elections for a new assembly. >> the president's supporters have also been taking to the streets, this time for the funerals of two demonstrators who were killed in clashes with opposition protesters earlier in the week. meanwhile, the german foreign minister says the violence puts the legacy of the revolution at risk. m e to pose a political powers must come together in a dialogue. they must develop a dialogue, when it takes into account all elements of society. >> so far, the call is not being heated. the main opposition groups have rejected offers of talks on saturday. >> for more, we go live to cairo. we mentioned the reports that protesters have broken through the barricade at the palace. how tense is the situation in cairo right now? >> [inaudible] >> a cake, we have to leave you there. we are having some trouble with the line, but thanks so much for joining us from cairo, and we apologize for the quality of that c
he saw the pentagon's estimate, he wrote in the margin, i doubt it, it took us three months just to take sicily. when the spending requests came in, he said, i know the boys at the pentagon. he believed real national security was from a sound economy. he was a deficit hawk, boy, we could use him today, who controlled government spending and taxes. the famous speech warning against the industrial complex was at the end of the presidency, but worked on it all along behind the scenes. heaven help us he liked to say when we get a president who knows less about the military than i do. it was not about the economy or saving money. in the berlin crisis and earlier crisis with korea and vietnam in 1953 over the strait in 1954-55 and 1958 in the suez crisis in 1956, he was planning a bigger gain for higher stakes. west point cadet and young army officer, ike was a great poker player, and, indeed, so good, he had to give it up. he was taking too much money from the fellow officers hurting his career. he switched to bridge, but he never forgot how to bluff. the soviets, he bluffed with nucl
, a discussion on the impact of skilled immigrant labor on the u.s. economy. at 11:00 q&a with crystal wright. there is another chance to see david cameron take questions from the house of commons. >> i don't mean just the channel but the able to find surprises. every month or every year i get some show that people are talking about that i don't think you can have imagined choosing. you could not convince me to choose honey boo boo. or a certain food channel networks. i don't think if i had to predetermine that was my preference i would have ever picked them. but the ability to stumble on them, to hear people talk about them and let me go into an environment and suddenly find i like honey boo boo and i'm watching its. i think that is a huge part of the experience and i think it is sold short. i still think a lot of americans love the enjoyment of escapism and being able to roam around the tv jungle finding things they did not know were there. >> ice -- i think people still love discovery. every month or every year, i hear some show people are suddenly talking about that i do not think you cou
as broadband and broadcast. >> host: senator gordon smith joins us as we began discussions on the future of television and he is president and ceo of the national association of broadcasters. thank you, sir. and ted gotsch from telecommunications report thank you for being on "the communicators." >> this week on q&a, pulitzer prize-winning author anne applebaum discusses her newest historical narrative entitled "iron curtain" subfive. c-span: anne applebaum why do you open up with the quote from winston churchill? >> guest: i open up of the quote because churchill is defined an era where talking about probably without meaning to. he coined the expression the iron curtain and it was such a motive and such, and such an evocative description of what had happened between 1944 and 1946 when he gave his speech that the quote comes from and i thought it was important to put that at the beginning of the book. c-span: did you ever find out why he called at the iron iron iron curtain? guess so there's x. a long and complicated story. it's actually a theatrical term. there was an iron curtain at t
, he wrote in the margin, i doubt. it took us three months just to take this on. when the spending request came in, ike would say i know those boys down at the pentagon. ike believed the real national security came from a sound economy. he was a deficit hawk. he controlled government spending and package. his famous speech warning against military-industrial complex came at the end of his presidency but, in fact, he been working on it all a long. mostly behind the scenes. heaven help us, he liked to say, that we'll get a president who knows less about the military than i do. this approach to the military was not just about the economy. in the berlin crisis in 58-59 and in early crisis with korea and vietnam in 1953, 54, the almost straight, the suez crisis in 1956, eisenhower was playing a bigger game for higher stakes. a west point cadet and a young army officer, ike had been a great poker player. indeed, he was so good that he had to give it up. he was taking too much money from his fellow officers and it was hurting his career. he switched to bridge, but he never forgot how to b
scientist from the european council on foreign relations. i would like to ask you to map out for us the reasons why the you got this very prestigious prize -- the eu is very prestigious prize. >> it is the only institution that managed the transition from several non-democracies to democracy. it is the first revolution in history without blood. i think that is largely worth the nobel prize, not counting the decades before or after 1949. >> some say this award is not justified. what do you say to this criticism? >> i think if we're in a crisis in your opinion now -- the european union now, it should not avoid looking at the merits of the past. look back. obama -- many people were saying he did not deserve the nobel peace prize, but he deserved it because it was a statement that now the u.s. is shifting back from the bush administration to obama. i think the same is true for the european union. >> your assessment has been pretty upbeat so far. i want to put this to you. at the top of the show, we said this is a day of celebration for the eu. no doubt about that. it also indicates it m
'll be great. and there were those of us at the time who said that's not going to work. and the reason we said back then is it's not going to work if you put in this year a big surge in government spending, even if that makes gdp go up this year, next year it goes down again. so if we're going to do to policies they're going to recommend, we had to know it would be great next year, and we could afford to lose the 2% growth, and we'd take the stimulus away. since that didn't seem plausible at the time, what we argued back then -- i could e-mail you testimonies -- was that we need to pursue policies somewhat reminiscent of what we see in the 4% growth chapter now. we were talking about what next steps should be, and there wasn't a democratic senator in that hearing who was willing to defend the stimulus on the record. and i was, i was being, you know, pretty combative in my testimony, and nobody argued with me. and the point is that the economy is still terrible. i think 2% is actually optimistic for what we're growing right now. and everybody wants to do something to fix it, and that's a great
. it just goes on forever. them putin also address u.s. criticism of moscow's security and human rights policies in response to news that a court had reduced the jail sentence of one of putin poses strongest critics. the president said that the case was not politically motivated, and he dismissed recent protests about his presidency. >> we do not need this anarchy. during the 1990's, this kind of anarchy give market economics and democracy a bad name in russia. people are still afraid of that today. >> the marathon press conference lasted four hours, but president putin had little to offer that was really new. >> it was a fighting performance by vladimir putin who likes to present himself as a faithful servant of the russian people, but there was a lack of fresh ideas and concrete answers. his words sounded a lot more like holding onto power than a new beginning for the good of russia. >> efforts to bail out ciphers are running into fresh obstacles. a german newspaper is reporting that the international monetary fund is not prepared to contribute to the bailout fund unless creditors wav
with hope and joy, for the savior has been born for us. >> for many in the audience, hearing the message in their own language was an obvious highlight. then came the blessing -- to the city and to the world. >> we are joined now in our studio by our religious affairs correspondent. it has been a busy year for the pope and the catholic church. >> it has indeed. it started off in february when he appointed 22 new cardinals, all europeans, to correct, as he saw it, the imbalance in the college of cardinals, created by his predecessor, john paul ii, who appointed a lot of latin americans. the pope wanted to restore the balance, as he saw it. then, of course, although he is 86 or will be in april, he said he was not going to travel much. in fact, he traveled quite a bit. he was in mexico, in cuba. he went to lebanon, celebrated a mass just 80 kilometers from where the fighting was. it has been a very busy year. and he published the third volume of his study in jesus christ. >> last night on christmas eve, the pope made one, that caught a lot of people's eyes, which was about technology, quit
language and sent it into battle. president kennedy liked the quote so much that he used it as his own. that was in 1963 when he granted winston churchill honorary citizenship of the united states. >> pierpont morgan was a friend of churchill's mother and is likely that winston on one of his many trip to its united states would have visited this library. we're joined today by alan packwood, he is the director of the churchill archive center in cambridge. and he's cure rating an exhi business here at the morgan called winston churchill, the power of words. >> what you're looking at here are two images taken by the famous photographer on the 30th of december 1941. winston churchill had just addressed the canadian parliament and he had made his way to the speakers chamber. he was looking for a drink, perhaps also for a cigar. and what he found instead was a photographer waiting for him. and more than that, because the photographer insisted on removing churchill's cigar. and then photographed the ensuing skoul. and it's clear that a few moments later the british prime minister lightened up
paragraph of euro bit wear. >> my obituary. >> what would you want us to say? would music be in the first sentence or two? >> no, i will say exactly what i said to the meerning extras. many singers. here lies ricardo muti, a crazy man that spent all his life trying to find a correct qafer or quarter note. >> rose: in pursuit of that your life was. >> that is a disaster. >> rose: but music has been good to you. >> very, very good. you know, music is the only art. and i know this by experience that can bring people together. and make people to communicate even if they don't speak the same language, if they have different religions. so when you left lascala, why did you leave? >> as i said, i was there for 19 years, longer than anybody elsement longer even than tuscanini and my relationship with the orchestra and chorus has been always for 19 years perfect. then when i had a fight with the administration, let's say, because i don't want to indicate this or that person, then everything became political. and in italy when something becomes political, and controversial, politically speaking the
introduced legislation allowing us to carry out spot checks. that has allowed us to introduce constant monitoring. we have not as proposed but implemented legislation on a statewide level. and we have introduced new guidelines with the focus on observing the behavior for warning signs. schools and the police have cooperated on a range of preventive measures. we have employed 100 school psychologists and we have taken on a more active role on issues concerning schools. we have really done quite a lot to prevent another event from occurring or make it possible. >> that was the minister of interior of speaking to us earlier. to afghanistan now where they have a visit in the base in the hindu kush praising the mission as an important mission and. he sang to them for his unexpected visit and they said they deserved more recognition for their role in a military that has a condition in serving a 48 force of peace internationally. >> a german government plane making a surprise stop in afghanistan. he made the unannounced present -- visit to thank them for their service and gain a better unders
. >> thank you for joining us. the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu has arrived in berlin, where he is expected to face criticism for his plans to expand settlements in the west bank and east jerusalem. before then, he stopped off in the czech republic. >> prague was the only government to vote no on the palestinian bid to gain non- member status. >> chancellor angela merkel has sought to reassert -- reassure the party's traditional wing. >> chancellor merkel's party conference went just the way she scripted it. was reelected chair with a record vote. there was no doubt criticism of her -- no loud criticism of her. >> our discussions here, especially on the outline we put forward, show that the christian democratic union is a foundation for a strong germany, a journey in which everyone gets a fair chance -- a germany in which everyone gets a fair chance. >> the party has rallied behind her ahead of next year's election, including traditional conservatives who have been could assert -- critical of her positions at times. >> we would be foolish not to take advantage of the recognition
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)